Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Letter .. Mrs. Sophie

My husband and I have to make donation that's why we are contacting you
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Letter .. Mrs. Sophie

My husband and I have to make donation that's why we are contacting you
"I would be interested to Receive Further details from you, we would
appreciate a prompt reply." Thank you. Please reply me
rizavasmrssophie@hotmail.com

Is wastewater the new black gold?

UNESCO and UN-Water Press release N°2017-25

Is wastewater the new black gold?

Launch of the United Nations World Water Development Report on 22 March

Durban, South Africa, 22 March – What if we were to consider the vast quantities of domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater discharged into the environment everyday as a valuable resource rather than costly problem? This is the paradigm shift advocated in the United Nations World Water Development Report, Wastewater: the Untapped Resource, launched today in Durban on the occasion of World Water Day..

The United Nations World Water Development Report is a UN-Water Report coordinated by the UN World Water Assessment Programme of UNESCO. It argues that once treated, wastewater could prove invaluable in meeting the growing demand for freshwater and other raw materials.

"Wastewater is a valuable resource in a world where water is finite and demand is growing," says Guy Ryder, Chair of UN-Water and Director-General of the International Labour Organization. "Everyone can do their bit to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target to halve the proportion of untreated wastewater and increase safe water reuse by 2030. It's all about carefully managing and recycling the water that runs through our homes, factories, farms and cities. Let's all reduce and safely reuse more wastewater so that this precious resource serves the needs of increasing populations and a fragile ecosystem."

"The 2017 World Water Development Report shows that improved wastewater management is as much about reducing pollution at the source, as removing contaminants from wastewater flows, reusing reclaimed water and recovering useful by-products. […] Raising social acceptance of the use of wastewater is essential to moving forward", argues UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova in her foreword to the Report.

A health and environmental concern

A large proportion of wastewater is still released into the environment without being either collected or treated. This is particularly true in low-income countries, which on average only treat 8 % of domestic and industrial wastewater, compared to 70% in high-income countries. As a result, in many regions of the world, water contaminated by bacteria, nitrates, phosphates and solvents is discharged into rivers and lakes ending up in the oceans, with negative consequences for the environment and public health.

The volume of wastewater to be treated will rise considerably in the near future especially in cities in developing countries with rapidly growing populations. "Wastewater generation is one of the biggest challenges associated with the growth of informal settlements (slums) in the developing world," say the report's authors. A city like Lagos (Nigeria) generates 1.5 million m3 of wastewater every day, most of which ends up untreated in the Lagos Lagoon. Unless action is taken now, this situation is likely to deteriorate further as the city's population rises to over 23 million by 2020.

Pollution from pathogens from human and animal excreta affects almost one third of rivers in Latin America, Asia and Africa, endangering the lives of millions of people. In 2012, 842,000 deaths in low- and middle-income countries were linked to contaminated water and inadequate sanitation services. The lack of treatment also contributes to the spread of some  tropical diseases such as dengue and cholera.

Solvents and hydrocarbons produced by industrial and mining activities, as well as the discharge of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) from intensive farming accelerate the eutrophication of freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems. An estimated 245,000 km2 of marine ecosystems—roughly the size of the United Kingdom—are currently affected by this phenomenon. The discharge of untreated wastewater also stimulates the proliferation of toxic algae blooms and contributes to the decline in biodiversity.

Growing awareness of the presence of pollutants such as hormones, antibiotics, steroids and endocrine disruptors in wastewater poses a new set of challenges as their impact on the environment and health have yet to be fully understood.

Pollution reduces the availability of freshwater supplies, which are already under stress not least because of climate change. Nevertheless, most governments and decision-makers have been primarily concerned by the challenges of water supply, notably when it is scarce, while overlooking the need to manage water after it has been used. Yet these two issues are intrinsically related. The collection, treatment and safe use of wastewater are at the very foundation of a circular economy, balancing economic development with the sustainable use of resources. Reclaimed water is a largely underexploited resource, which can be reused many times.

From sewer to tap

Wastewater is most commonly used for agricultural irrigation and at least 50 countries worldwide are known to use wastewater for this purpose, accounting for an estimated 10 % of all irrigated land. However, data remains incomplete for many regions, notably Africa.

But this practice raises health concerns when the water contains pathogens that can contaminate crops. The challenge, then, is to move from informal irrigation towards planned and safe use, as Jordan, where 90% of treated wastewater is used for irrigation, has been doing since 1977. In Israel, treated wastewater already accounts for nearly half of all water used for irrigation.

In industry, large quantities of water can be reused, for example for heating and cooling, instead of being discharged into the environment. By 2020, the market for industrial wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 50 %.

Treated wastewater can also serve to augment drinking water supplies, although this is still a marginal practice. Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, has been doing this since 1969.  To counter recurrent freshwater shortages, the city has installed infrastructure to treat up to 35% of wastewater, which is then used to supplement drinking water reserves. Residents of Singapore and San Diego (USA) also safely drink water that has been recycled.

This practice can meet with resistance from the public, who may be uncomfortable with the idea of drinking or using water they consider to have once been dirty. Lack of public support led to the failure of a project to reuse water for irrigation and fish farming in Egypt in the 1990s. Awareness-raising campaigns can help gain public acceptance for this type of practice by referring to successful examples, such as that of the astronauts on the International Space Station who have been reusing the same recycled water for over 16 years.

Wastewater and sludge as a source of raw materials

As well as providing a safe alternative source for freshwater, wastewater can also be seen as a potential source of raw materials. Thanks to developments in treatment techniques, certain nutrients, like phosphorus and nitrates, can now be recovered from sewage and sludge and turned into fertilizer. An estimated 22% of global demand for phosphorus, a finite and depleting mineral resource, could be met by treating human urine and excrement. Some countries, like Switzerland, have already passed legislation calling for the mandatory recovery of certain nutrients such as phosphorus.

The organic substances contained in wastewater could be used to produce biogas, which could help power wastewater treatment facilities, helping them transition from major consumers to becoming energy neutral or even net energy producers. In Japan, the government has set itself the target of recovering 30% of the biomass energy in wastewater by 2020. Every year, the city of Osaka produces 6,500 tonnes of biosolid fuels from 43,000 tonnes of sewage sludge.

Such technologies need not be out of reach for developing countries as low-cost treatment solutions already allow for the extraction of energy and nutrients. They may not yet allow for the direct recovery of potable water, but they can produce viable and safe water for other uses, such as irrigation. And sales of raw materials derived from wastewater can provide additional revenue to help cover the investment and operational costs of wastewater treatment.

Today, 2.4 billion people still do not have access to improved sanitation facilities. Reducing this figure, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6 on water and sanitation of the UN 2030 Agenda, will mean discharging even more wastewater, which will then need to be treated affordably.

Some progress has already been made. In Latin America, for example, the treatment of wastewater has almost doubled since the late 1990s and covers between 20% and 30% of wastewater collected in urban sewer networks. But that also means that between 70% and 80% is released without treatment, so there is still a long way to go. An essential step on that road will have been taken with the widespread recognition of the value of safely using treated wastewater and its valuable by-products as an alternative to raw freshwater.

***

Note to the editors

The United Nations World Water Development Report is a UN-Water Report produced by the UN World Water Assessment Programme of UNESCO. The Report is the result of the collaboration between the 31 entities of the United Nations System and the 38 international partners that comprise UN-Water. The Report presents an exhaustive review of the state of global water resources and, up until 2012, was published every three years. Since 2014, the WWDR is published annually, with each edition focused on a given theme. It is launched every year on World Water Day, 22 March, which shares the same theme as the report.

Download the WWDR Report

Facts and Figures

Read the Executive Summary

Watch the video

 

 

Media contact: Agnès Bardon, UNESCO Media Service. Tel: +33 (0)14568 1764, a.bardon@unesco.org

 

 



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UNESCO, 7, place de Fontenoy, PARIS, NA FRANCE France

Monday, March 20, 2017

Call for Expression of Interest

Sir/Madam,

 

UNESCO is looking for a higher educational institution delivering the Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in order to pilot and localize its document “Learning for All: Guidelines on the Inclusion of Learner with Disabilities in Open and Distance Learning”. The guidelines should be piloted in the higher educational institution delivering ODL or which provides open and distance learning programmes, as well as considers making changes at institutional level.

The detailed Plan of Action should include: (i) assessment and analysis of current situation using the matrix of actions and technical annexes; (ii) identification of key challenges and opportunities, as well as (iii) concrete actions and recommendations for different educational stakeholders in order to make ODL inclusive for all learners.

The final delivery date is 15 November 2017.

Call for Expression of Interest is available at: https://en.unesco.org/sites/default/files/expression_interest_odl.pdf

http://en.unesco.org/news/call-piloting-guidelines-inclusion-learners-disabilities-open-and-distance-learning

[apeid.higher_education.bgk] Call for Expression of Interest

Sir/Madam,

 

UNESCO is looking for a higher educational institution delivering the Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in order to pilot and localize its document "Learning for All: Guidelines on the Inclusion of Learner with Disabilities in Open and Distance Learning". The guidelines should be piloted in the higher educational institution delivering ODL or which provides open and distance learning programmes, as well as considers making changes at institutional level.

The detailed Plan of Action should include: (i) assessment and analysis of current situation using the matrix of actions and technical annexes; (ii) identification of key challenges and opportunities, as well as (iii) concrete actions and recommendations for different educational stakeholders in order to make ODL inclusive for all learners.

The final delivery date is 15 November 2017.

Call for Expression of Interest is available : https://en.unesco.org/sites/default/files/expression_interest_odl.pdf

http://en.unesco.org/news/call-piloting-guidelines-inclusion-learners-disabilities-open-and-distance-learning

 

 

Friday, March 17, 2017

Is wastewater the new black gold?

EMBARGO UNTIL 22 MARCH, 00h00 GMT

UNESCO and UN-Water Press release N°2017-25

Is wastewater the new black gold?

Launch of the United Nations World Water Development Report on 22 March

Durban, South Africa, 22 March – What if we were to consider the vast quantities of domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater discharged into the environment everyday as a valuable resource rather than costly problem? This is the paradigm shift advocated in the United Nations World Water Development Report, Wastewater: the Untapped Resource, launched today in Durban on the occasion of World Water Day..

The United Nations World Water Development Report is a UN-Water Report coordinated by the UN World Water Assessment Programme of UNESCO. It argues that once treated, wastewater could prove invaluable in meeting the growing demand for freshwater and other raw materials.

"Wastewater is a valuable resource in a world where water is finite and demand is growing," says Guy Ryder, Chair of UN-Water and Director-General of the International Labour Organization. "Everyone can do their bit to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target to halve the proportion of untreated wastewater and increase safe water reuse by 2030. It's all about carefully managing and recycling the water that runs through our homes, factories, farms and cities. Let's all reduce and safely reuse more wastewater so that this precious resource serves the needs of increasing populations and a fragile ecosystem."

"The 2017 World Water Development Report shows that improved wastewater management is as much about reducing pollution at the source, as removing contaminants from wastewater flows, reusing reclaimed water and recovering useful by-products. […] Raising social acceptance of the use of wastewater is essential to moving forward", argues UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova in her foreword to the Report.

A health and environmental concern

A large proportion of wastewater is still released into the environment without being either collected or treated. This is particularly true in low-income countries, which on average only treat 8 % of domestic and industrial wastewater, compared to 70% in high-income countries. As a result, in many regions of the world, water contaminated by bacteria, nitrates, phosphates and solvents is discharged into rivers and lakes ending up in the oceans, with negative consequences for the environment and public health.

The volume of wastewater to be treated will rise considerably in the near future especially in cities in developing countries with rapidly growing populations. "Wastewater generation is one of the biggest challenges associated with the growth of informal settlements (slums) in the developing world," say the report's authors. A city like Lagos (Nigeria) generates 1.5 million m3 of wastewater every day, most of which ends up untreated in the Lagos Lagoon. Unless action is taken now, this situation is likely to deteriorate further as the city's population rises to over 23 million by 2020.

Pollution from pathogens from human and animal excreta affects almost one third of rivers in Latin America, Asia and Africa, endangering the lives of millions of people. In 2012, 842,000 deaths in low- and middle-income countries were linked to contaminated water and inadequate sanitation services. The lack of treatment also contributes to the spread of some  tropical diseases such as dengue and cholera.

Solvents and hydrocarbons produced by industrial and mining activities, as well as the discharge of nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) from intensive farming accelerate the eutrophication of freshwater and coastal marine ecosystems. An estimated 245,000 km2 of marine ecosystems—roughly the size of the United Kingdom—are currently affected by this phenomenon. The discharge of untreated wastewater also stimulates the proliferation of toxic algae blooms and contributes to the decline in biodiversity.

Growing awareness of the presence of pollutants such as hormones, antibiotics, steroids and endocrine disruptors in wastewater poses a new set of challenges as their impact on the environment and health have yet to be fully understood.

Pollution reduces the availability of freshwater supplies, which are already under stress not least because of climate change. Nevertheless, most governments and decision-makers have been primarily concerned by the challenges of water supply, notably when it is scarce, while overlooking the need to manage water after it has been used. Yet these two issues are intrinsically related. The collection, treatment and safe use of wastewater are at the very foundation of a circular economy, balancing economic development with the sustainable use of resources. Reclaimed water is a largely underexploited resource, which can be reused many times.

From sewer to tap

Wastewater is most commonly used for agricultural irrigation and at least 50 countries worldwide are known to use wastewater for this purpose, accounting for an estimated 10 % of all irrigated land. However, data remains incomplete for many regions, notably Africa.

But this practice raises health concerns when the water contains pathogens that can contaminate crops. The challenge, then, is to move from informal irrigation towards planned and safe use, as Jordan, where 90% of treated wastewater is used for irrigation, has been doing since 1977. In Israel, treated wastewater already accounts for nearly half of all water used for irrigation.

In industry, large quantities of water can be reused, for example for heating and cooling, instead of being discharged into the environment. By 2020, the market for industrial wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 50 %.

Treated wastewater can also serve to augment drinking water supplies, although this is still a marginal practice. Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, has been doing this since 1969.  To counter recurrent freshwater shortages, the city has installed infrastructure to treat up to 35% of wastewater, which is then used to supplement drinking water reserves. Residents of Singapore and San Diego (USA) also safely drink water that has been recycled.

This practice can meet with resistance from the public, who may be uncomfortable with the idea of drinking or using water they consider to have once been dirty. Lack of public support led to the failure of a project to reuse water for irrigation and fish farming in Egypt in the 1990s. Awareness-raising campaigns can help gain public acceptance for this type of practice by referring to successful examples, such as that of the astronauts on the International Space Station who have been reusing the same recycled water for over 16 years.

Wastewater and sludge as a source of raw materials

As well as providing a safe alternative source for freshwater, wastewater can also be seen as a potential source of raw materials. Thanks to developments in treatment techniques, certain nutrients, like phosphorus and nitrates, can now be recovered from sewage and sludge and turned into fertilizer. An estimated 22% of global demand for phosphorus, a finite and depleting mineral resource, could be met by treating human urine and excrement. Some countries, like Switzerland, have already passed legislation calling for the mandatory recovery of certain nutrients such as phosphorus.

The organic substances contained in wastewater could be used to produce biogas, which could help power wastewater treatment facilities, helping them transition from major consumers to becoming energy neutral or even net energy producers. In Japan, the government has set itself the target of recovering 30% of the biomass energy in wastewater by 2020. Every year, the city of Osaka produces 6,500 tonnes of biosolid fuels from 43,000 tonnes of sewage sludge.

Such technologies need not be out of reach for developing countries as low-cost treatment solutions already allow for the extraction of energy and nutrients. They may not yet allow for the direct recovery of potable water, but they can produce viable and safe water for other uses, such as irrigation. And sales of raw materials derived from wastewater can provide additional revenue to help cover the investment and operational costs of wastewater treatment.

Today, 2.4 billion people still do not have access to improved sanitation facilities. Reducing this figure, in keeping with Sustainable Development Goal 6 on water and sanitation of the UN 2030 Agenda, will mean discharging even more wastewater, which will then need to be treated affordably.

Some progress has already been made. In Latin America, for example, the treatment of wastewater has almost doubled since the late 1990s and covers between 20% and 30% of wastewater collected in urban sewer networks. But that also means that between 70% and 80% is released without treatment, so there is still a long way to go. An essential step on that road will have been taken with the widespread recognition of the value of safely using treated wastewater and its valuable by-products as an alternative to raw freshwater.

***

Note to the editors

The United Nations World Water Development Report is a UN-Water Report produced by the UN World Water Assessment Programme of UNESCO. The Report is the result of the collaboration between the 31 entities of the United Nations System and the 38 international partners that comprise UN-Water. The Report presents an exhaustive review of the state of global water resources and, up until 2012, was published every three years. Since 2014, the WWDR is published annually, with each edition focused on a given theme. It is launched every year on World Water Day, 22 March, which shares the same theme as the report.

To download the WWDR Report:

http://www.unesco.org/new/wwdr-media

user: media-wwdr2017
password: DurbanSDG_6

 

Media contact: Agnès Bardon, UNESCO Media Service. Tel: +33 (0)14568 1764, a.bardon@unesco.org

 

 



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UNESCO, 7, place de Fontenoy, PARIS, NA FRANCE France

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

CSSP Open Workshop - Indo-French Perspectives on Digital Studies | 15th March, at JNU Convention Centre

Open Workshop

Indo-French Perspectives on Digital Studies

 

An IFRIS – JNU Initiative

Organised by the Digital Studies Group, New Delhi

 

Wednesday, 15th March, 2017

Committee Room No. 108, Convention Centre

Jawaharlal Nehru University

New Delhi-110067

 


Introductory Session 9:00am – 9:30am

Introductory Remarks: Saradindu Bhaduri, Chairperson, CSSP, JNU.

Introduction to Indo-French Partnership: Madhav Govind, CSSP, JNU.

Marine Al Dahdah, Paris Descartes University, CEPED, Paris - CSH-Delhi.


Session 1: Open Access 9:30am 11:00am

Chairperson/Discussant: Rajiv Mishra, CSSP (JNU)

Speaker 1: Marianne Noël, CNRS-LISIS, Paris               

Speaker 2: Anubha Sinha, Centre for Internet & Society, New Delhi


Tea Break 11:00 am- 11:30 am


Session 2: Materiality of the Digital: People, Spaces, Infrastructures 11.30 am – 1:00pm

Chairperson/Discussant: Vidya Subramanian, HT, New Delhi.

Speaker 1: Ravi Sundaram, CSDS-Sarai, Delhi.

Speaker 2:  Rajarshi Dasgupta, Centre for Political Studies, SSS, JNU  

Speaker 3: Aurélie Varrel, French Institute of Pondicherry, CNRS-CEIAS.


Lunch Break 1:00 am to 2:00 pm


Session 3: Digital Governance and Databases 2:00pm-3.30 pm

Chairperson/Discussant: Khetrimayum Monish, CIS Delhi,.

Speaker 1: Eric Dagiral, Paris Descartes University , CERLIS, Paris.

Speaker 2: Ravi Shukla Head, India-SDC, Netvision Corporation Singapore
and Independent Researcher on IT and society. 


Tea Break  3.30 pm to 4:00 pm


Concluding Session: Synthesis  4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Speaker: Mathieu Quet, CSSP (JNU), IRD-Paris


Friday, March 10, 2017

Governance of maritime space, conference organized by UNESCO and the European Commission

UNESCO Media Advisiory No.2017-06

Governance of maritime space, conference organized by UNESCO and the European Commission

Paris, 10 March- UNESCO and the European Commission are hosting an international conference on marine spatial planning, a process that seeks to regulate human activities in the waters bordering coastal areas so as to preserve marine ecosystems, avoid conflicts between sectors of commercial and industrial activity, and promote international cooperation. (UNESCO Headquarters, 15 to 17 March).

Organized by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC) and the Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries of the European Commission, the conference will bring together more than 350 experts from all over the world. It will provide an opportunity to take stock of existing marine spatial planning (MSP) to date, exchange best practices, encourage cooperation among countries sharing coastal and marine waters, and establish priorities for the coming years.

On the sidelines of the conference, participants will be invited to take part in a role- game, the MSP Challenge. It is designed to improve the players' understanding of the marine spatial planning process by getting them to take on the parts of environmental activist, industrialist and decision-maker.

Marine spatial planning has become increasingly important due to the intensification of activities beside traditional fishing and shipping. Recent decades have seen the development of marine aggregates extraction, offshore aquaculture, renewable marine energy generation and more. MSP aims to bring together all users to help them coordinate decision-making, avoid inter sectoral conflicts and resource overexploitation.

Marine spatial plans today cover almost 10% of the world's exclusive economic zones (marine areas stretching over 200 nautical miles from the coastline on which States exercise sovereign rights, notably with regard to the exploitation of resources)

Since 2006, IOC has been assisting countries in implementing this type of ecosystem-based management through its Marine Spatial Planning initiative. In 2009, IOC published Marine spatial planning: a step-by-step approach to ecosystem-based management a guide to support  countries implementing management plans for their marine regions [available in English, Spanish and Vietnamese].

In 2014, the European Union adopted legislation to create a common framework for maritime spatial planning in Europe. Since then, the European Commission has funded cross-border planning projects worth €18 million.

The conference is expected to pave the way for the adoption of a road map by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and the Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries of the European Commission to encourage marine spatial planning in all seas and oceans of the globe. The objective is to triple the surface of marine areas benefiting from spatial planning by 2025 to cover one third of total waters under national jurisdictions.

****

More information about the conference


More information on the European directive on MSP


More information on the MSP Challenge
(An event open to journalists accredited by UNESCO and invited experts only)

Media contact: Agnès Bardon, UNESCO Press Service. Tel: +33 (0) 1 45 68 17 64, a.bardon@unesco.org

 



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UNESCO, 7, place de Fontenoy, PARIS, NA FRANCE France

CSSP Talk "Technological Roots of Structural Imbalance in the Indian Economy" by Prof Vinod Vyasulu | 15th March 2017, 11:00 a.m.

Centre for Studies in Science Policy

School of Social Sciences, JNU

Invites you to

                                                               

A Talk on

Technological Roots of Structural Imbalance in the Indian Economy

 by

Professor Vinod Vyasulu

O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, India

 

Venue:  Room No. 227, 2nd Floor, SSS-1

Date:    Wednesday, 15th March 2017

Time:   11:00 a.m.

 

Abstract: Over the years, there has been a growing imbalance in the structure of the Indian economy. While the share of agriculture in the economy has dropped from around 66% fifty years ago, to about 15% today, the share of people dependent on this sector has still remained at around 60%. This is one indicator of poverty. I propose to look at the technological roots of this imbalance in this presentation.

About the Speaker: Professor Vinod Vyasulu earned a PhD from the School of Business Administration in the University of Florida. He has taught in the Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore, and XLRI, Jamshedpur. He was Director of the Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad, and held the RBI Chair in the Institute for Social and Economic Change, Bangalore. He also had a stint as Economic Adviser for Small Scale Industries in the National Small Industries Corporation, Delhi. He was Director of the Centre for Budget and Policy Studies in Bangalore. Currently he is Professor and Vice Dean, Jindal School of Government and Policy in Sonipat. He can be contacted at vvyasulu@jgu.edu.in.

 

All are welcome to attend the lecture.

Coordinators, CSSP Lecture Series

Thursday, March 9, 2017

[apeid.higher_education.bgk] Call for nominations for the 2017 Edition of the UNESCO Prize for Girls’ and Women’s Education

Version française ci-dessous

Dear colleagues,

The second edition of the UNESCO Prize for Girls' and Women's Education is now open for nominations.

Generously supported by the Government of the People's Republic of China, the Prize annually awards US $50,000 for two recipients (individuals, institutions and non-governmental organizations) making outstanding contributions to girls' and women's education. It was established by the UNESCO Executive Board at its 197th session, and awarded for the first time in 2016. 

The 2017 nomination process takes place online via a platform accessible through the UNESCO website: http://unesco.org/gwe. Permanent Delegations, National Commissions and NGOs in official partnership with UNESCO will be able to connect with their existing generic UNESTEAMS accounts.

I invite you to disseminate this information widely to your networks and relevant stakeholders involved in girls' and women's education (regional governments, public/private educational institutions, NGOs, local communities, media), in order to give all potential candidates the opportunity to participate.

The nominations should be submitted by Permanent Delegations to UNESCO via the online form in English or French by 5 May 2017 at the very latest (midnight, Paris time). Further information on the Prize and its nomination process, including a user guide for the online platform, can be accessed at http://en.unesco.org/themes/women-s-and-girls-education/prize.

Enquiries regarding the nomination process may be addressed to Mr Leyong Gao, Section of Education for Inclusion and Gender Equality, phone: +33 1 45 68 17 96; e-mail: GWEprize@unesco.org.

Thank you.

Yours sincerely,

 

Qian TANG

Assistant Director-General for Education

Education Sector

7, Place de Fontenoy

F-75352 Paris 07 SP

Tel:  +33 (0) 14568 08 31

www.unesco.org/education

 

 

 

*******

Chers Collègues,

L'appel à candidatures pour la deuxième édition du Prix UNESCO pour l'éducation des filles et de femmes est maintenant ouvert.

Grâce au généreux soutien du gouvernement de la République populaire de Chine, le Prix d'un montant de 50,000 dollars des États-Unis récompense annuellement deux bénéficiaires (individus, institutions et organisations non gouvernementales) qui contribuent de façon exceptionnelle à l'éducation des filles et des femmes. Il a été créé par le Conseil exécutif de l'UNESCO à sa 197e session et a été décerné pour la première fois en 2016.

Le processus de candidature pour l'année 2017 se déroule en ligne via une plate-forme accessible depuis le site Internet de l'UNESCO : http://unesco.org/gwe. Les Délégations permanentes, les Commissions nationales et les Organisations non gouvernementales (ONG) en partenariat officiel avec l'UNESCO pourront s'y connecter avec leurs comptes génériques UNESTEAMS.

Je vous invite à diffuser largement cet appel à candidatures dans vos réseaux et auprès d'acteurs pertinents qui sont engagés dans l'éducation des filles et des femmes (gouvernements régionaux, établissements d'enseignement publics/privés, ONG, communautés locales, médias), afin de permettre à tous les candidats potentiels de participer.

Les candidatures doivent être soumises à l'UNESCO par les Délégations permanentes en anglais ou en français via le formulaire en ligne au plus tard le 5 mai 2017 (à minuit, heure de Paris). Vous trouverez plus d'informations sur le Prix et la procédure de candidature, ainsi qu'un guide d'utilisation pour la plateforme en ligne, à cette adresse : http://fr.unesco.org/themes/leducation-filles-femmes/prix .

Toute demande de renseignements en ce qui concerne la procédure de candidature doit être adressée à M. Leyong GAO, Section de l'éducation en vue de l'inclusion et de l'égalité des genres, tél. : +33 1 45 68 17 96, e-mail : GWEprize@unesco.org

Je vous en remercie.

Cordialement,

 

Qian TANG

Assistant Director-General for Education

Education Sector

7, Place de Fontenoy

F-75352 Paris 07 SP

Tel:  +33 (0) 14568 08 31

www.unesco.org/education

 

 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

L'Oréal and UNESCO recognize 15young women researchers for their outstanding contribution to science

UNESCO Press Release N°2017-21

L'Oréal and UNESCO recognize 15 young women researchers for their outstanding contribution to science

Paris, 8 March - Fifteen outstanding young women researchers, selected among more than 250 candidates in the framework of the 19th edition of the L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science awards, will receive the International Rising Talent fellowship during a gala on 21 March at the hotel Pullman Tour Eiffel de Paris. By recognizing their achievements at a key moment in their careers, the For Women in Science programme aims to help them pursue their research.

Since 1998, the L'Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science programme has highlighted the achievements of outstanding women scientists and supported promising younger women who are in the early stages of their scientific careers. Selected among the best national and regional L'Oréal-UNESCO fellows, the International Rising Talents come from all regions of the world (Africa and Arab States, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America and North America).

Together with the five laureates of the 2017 L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science awards, they will participate in a week of events, training and exchanges that will culminate with the award ceremony on 23 March 2017 at the Mutualité in Paris.

The 2017 International Rising Talent are recognized for their work in the following five categories:

Watching the brain at work

  • Doctor Lorina NACI, Canada
    Fundamental medicine
    In a coma: is the patient conscious or unconscious?
  • Associate Professor Muireann Irish, Australia

Clinical medicine
Recognizing Alzheimer's before the first signs appear.

On the road to conceiving new medical treatments

  • Doctor Hyun Lee, Germany
    Biological Sciences
    Neurodegenerative diseases: untangling aggregated proteins.
  • Doctor Nam-Kyung Yu, Republic of Korea
    Biological Sciences
    Rett syndrome: neuronal cells come under fire
  • Doctor Stephanie Fanucchi, South Africa
    Biological Sciences
    Better understanding the immune system.
  • Doctor Julia Etulain, Argentina
    Biological Sciences
    Better tissue healing. 

Finding potential new sources of drugs

  • Doctor Rym Ben Sallem, Tunisia
    Biological Sciences
    New antibiotics are right under our feet.
  • Doctor Hab Joanna Sulkowska, Poland
    Biological Sciences
    Unraveling the secrets of entangled proteins.

Getting to the heart of matter

  • Ms Nazek El-Atab, United Arab Emirates
    Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering
    Miniaturizing electronics without losing memory.
  • Doctor Bilge Demirkoz, Turkey
    Physics
    Piercing the secrets of cosmic radiation.
  • Doctor Tamara Elzein, Lebanon
    Material Sciences
    Trapping radioactivity.
  • Doctor Ran Long, China
    Chemistry
    Unlocking the potential of energy resources with nanochemistry.

Examining the past to shed light on the future – or vice versa

  • Doctor Fernanda Werneck, Brazil
    Biological Sciences
    Predicting how animal biodiversity will evolve.
  • Doctor Sam Giles, United Kingdom
    Biological Sciences
    Taking another look at the evolution of vertebrates thanks to their braincases.
  • Doctor Ágnes Kóspál, Hungary
    Astronomy and Space Sciences
    Looking at the birth of distant suns and planets to better understand the solar system.

 



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Sunday, February 26, 2017

National Symposium on Improving eGovernance using Big Data Analytics - IIT Delhi | 28 February

Greetings!

IIT Delhi is hosting a National Symposium on Improving eGovernance using Big Data Analytics (IEGBDA). We, being an academic partner for the prestigious 10th ICEGOV Conference (International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance) and India hosting it for the first time, we are coming up with this run-up symposium. 

Date: February 28, 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 8:45 AM to 1:00 PM
Venue: Vishwakarma Bhawan, DMS, IIT Delhi

The event is expected to be attended by the professionals, students, and researchers working in the domain. The event is open to all. No fees involved. However, prior registration is mandatory due to the limited number of seats. No fees are involved. Participants will be awarded a certificate.

Registration Link: bit.ly/iegbda2017

JNU celebrates National Science Day 2017 | 28th February at JNU Convention Centre


JNU celebrates National Science Day 2017 | 28th February at JNU Convention Centre, New Delhi, India

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

New Book | Space India 2.0: Commerce, Policy, Security and Governance Perspectives | by ORF India, 2017

New Book
Space India 2.0: Commerce, Policy, Security and Governance Perspectives
edited by Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan and Narayan Prasad. Observer Research Foundation, India, 2017, ISBN: 9788186818282.

About the Book
India's space programme has taken huge strides since its humble beginnings six decades ago. Today, India is recognised as a self-reliant spacefaring nation with capabilities not only in rudimentary missions, but in the most complex as well. This book addresses the prevalent policy issues in space and suggests measures to address them. In a world where space exploration and use carry a multitude of roles that range from peacekeeping to forewarning against disasters - Space India 2.0 seeks to serve as a guidebook for the country's policy makers.

Table of Contents
Foreword | K Kasturirangan, former Chairman, ISRO
Introduction | Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan and Narayan Prasad
Section I Space Commerce
1. Space 2.0 India: Leapfrogging Indian Space Commerce | Narayan Prasad
2. Traditional Space and NewSpace Industry in India: Current Outlook and Perspectives for the Future | Narayan Prasad
3. A Review of India's Commercial Space Efforts | K R Sridhara Murthi
4. Exploring the Potential of Satellite Connectivity for Digital India | Neha Satak, Madhukara Putty, Prasad H L Bhat
5. Unlocking the Potential of Geospatial Data | Arup Dasgupta
6. Developing a Space Start-up Incubator to Build a NewSpace Ecosystem in India | Narayan Prasad
7. Electronic Propulsion & Launch Vehicles: Today and Beyond – An Indian Perspective | Rohan M Ganapathy, Arun Radhakrishnan and Yashas Karanam
Section II Space Policy
8. Privatisation of Space in India and the Need for A Law | Kumar Abhijeet
9. SATCOM Policy: Bridging the Present and the Future | Ashok GV and Riddhi D'Souza
10. A Review of India's Geospatial Policy | Ranjana Kaul
11. Formation of PSLV Joint Venture: Legal Issues | Malay Adhikari
12. Exploring Space as an Instrument in India's Foreign Policy & Diplomacy | Vidya Sagar Reddy
Section III Space Security
13. India's Strategic Space Programme: From Apprehensive Beginner to Ardent Operator | Ajey Lele
14. Space Situational Awareness and Its Importance | Moriba Jah
15. Need for an Indian Military Space Policy | Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan
Section IV International Cooperation
16. Cooperation in Space between India and France | Jacques Blamont
17. India-US: New Dynamism in Old Partnership | Victoria Samson
18. Evolution of India-Russia Partnership | Vladimir Korovkin
19. Cooperating with Israel: Strategic Convergence | Deganit Paikowsky and Daniel Barok
20. An Asian Space Partnership with Japan? | Kazuto Suzuki
21. India and Australia: Emerging Possibilities | Jason Held
Section V Space Sustainability and Global Governance
22. Space Debris Tracking: An Indian Perspective | MYS Prasad
23. Astro-propriation: Investment Protections for and from Space Mining Operations | Daniel A Porras
24. Sustainability, Security and Article VI of the Outer Space Treaty | Charles Stotler
25. Space Security, Sustainability, and Global Governance: India-Japan Collaboration in Outer Space | Yasushi Horikawa
26. India and Global Space Governance: Need for A Pro-active Approach | Rajeswari Pillai Rajagopalan

CfPs: 14th ASIALICS Conference 2017 | 29-31 August | Tehran, Iran

14th ASIALICS Conference
29-31 August 2017
Tehran, Iran 
Conference Theme: Technological learning, innovation and catching-up in the context of international collaborations

Call for Papers
The conference will explore, among other things, the modes of technological learning and innovation within the context of international collaborations for successful catching up. It is extremely important for the West-Asia to learn from the experiences of the East-Asian's successful countries; while it needs to explore its own way based on its internal capabilities and conditions. We welcome papers pertaining to the issues of technological learning and innovation, capability building, catching-up and even development in different levels (i.e. firms, industries or countries). We would like to see the ramifications of these experiences and their implicated learning for the West-Asian countries. West-Asian countries, especially the Middle-East region, is characterized by rich diversity of resources, religious heritage, warm climate, especial geographical location and somehow a turbulence political situation. Analysis of the role of each of those factors in the success or failure stories within this region is highly welcomed.
Similar factors are also welcomed to be further scrutinized such as the role of finance, intellectual property rights, foreign direct investment, standardization, industrial policies. Those studies could reveal general bottlenecks that might impose substantial barriers in the way of learning and catching-up. Especial attention would be the role of international collaborations and the possible ways for enhancing technological learning within this context. Comparative studies would also be very interesting in order to reveal the similarities and differences between the context of West-Asia and other regions. We encourage participants to use any possible sources to conduct those types of comparative studies. Keynote lecture will be given by Prof. Lundvall from Aalborg University, Denmark and Prof. Djeflat from Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille (Lille-1), France. We may add some extra keynote lecturers according to the conference program. If you wish to be involved, remember we are open for full paper submissions (under 12,000 words and original, in that it has not been presented before), to be registered before 8th of June 2017. Paper submission and registration are online via the conference website. Further information and news are also available via the conference website. Please don't forget to check for important dates too.

Paper submission deadline: 8th June 2017

Best Paper Award: Best International paper, best PhD student paper and the best Iranian paper will be awarded according to the scientific committee judgments.

FundingSome funding might be available for travel expense or accommodation. If you need funding, after acceptance of your paper you could apply for it.


CfPs: 15th Globelics Conference 2017 | 11-13 October | Athens, Greece

15th Globelics Conference
11-13 October 2017
National Technical University of Athens, Greece 

The Globelics International Conference 2017
The 15th Globelics Conference will be held in Athens, Greece. It will be hosted by the Laboratory of Industrial and Energy Economics (LIEE) at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), the oldest (established in 1837) and most prestigious Greek academic institution in the field of Technology and Engineering. Athens will be the first European city to host the Globelics Annual Conference. This was considered as an opportunity to highlight the challenges for a country hit by the recent economic crisis. Innovation and competence building in the context of industrial and institutional change can be of great importance when envisaging a strategy out of the crisis. The conference will combine plenary sessions, presentations of research papers in parallel tracks, thematic panel sessions or special sessions, poster presentations, a book presentation session and debate,exhibition on industrial research in Greece, innovative start-ups presentations, sightseeing and cultural events, as well as artistic and culinary exhibitions.

Background
Globelics is a worldwide network of more than 2000 scholars engaged in research on how innovation and competence building contribute to economic and sustainable development. The network is open and diverse in terms of disciplines, perspectives and research tools. Globelics is a platform for cooperation and interactive learning. It was conceived at the very beginning of the new millennium. Inspired by the work of Christopher Freeman and Richard Nelson, the network was initially built on conversations among scholars in the South and in the North and developed by economists and experts on innovation systems. Over time the network has integrated expertise from a wider social science background and experts on broader aspects of development.
One of its main activities is the Annual Globelics Conference, which brings together over 400 leading and young scholars from all over the world. The Conference also aims at building research capacity and orienting research toward the local challenges of the host country. 

Conference Theme
The main conference theme for Globlelics 2017 is Innovation and Capacity Building in the context of financialisation and uneven development of the global economy: new roles for the state, productive sector, and social actors.
The conference invites papers addressing the role of different types of actors such as the State, local authorities, continental entities, knowledge institutions, productive political and social actors in shaping innovation and capacity building so as to achieve sustainable and inclusive growth. In particular, it aims to explore whether we need new approaches to study inequality in the age of globalization as there are widening disparities within countries, regions and social classes. The conference will also consider the need to tackle new challenges related to innovation and capacity building in addition to our systems of innovation approach. The conference also welcomes papers studying how systems of policies can be implemented at different levels and across different countries to innovate out of the crisis.

Conference Tracks
Accepted papers will be organized around parallel paper tracks encompassing:
1. University relationships with industry and society: the developmental university
2. Indigenous knowledge, informal sector, innovation and development
3. Gender, innovation and development
4. Science, technology, innovation policy and development
5. Intellectual property rights, open innovation and development
6. National, continental and regional innovation system
7. Technological infrastructure and technological capabilities
8. Sectoral innovation system, systemic industrial policy and development
9. Innovation systems, networks, global value chains and foreign direct investments
10. Entrepreneurship and innovation management in companies, organizations, government and local authorities
11. Agricultural innovation system
12. Science, technology, innovation and the sustainable development goals
13. Creative industries, smart cities and economic development
14. Innovation, financialization and the global crisis: what kind of policies and strategies are needed?
15. Innovation studies: Empirical methodologies, data requirements, indicators, different approaches and methodologies

Paper submission: We encourage scholars at scientific institutions, universities, enterprises and public sector institutions to take this opportunity to present their work to leading scholars in the field of innovation and development. We especially encourage young researchers to submit papers. Papers for oral presentations and poster presentation must be written in English, and the selected ones must be presented at the conference in English. Submission of full paper (in PDF) not exceeding 12,000 words (including notes, tables, appendices, list of references, etc.) should be made from 1st until 30th April 2017 via the online submission form available at the Conference website: www.liee.ntua.gr/globelics2017.
Papers must be submitted no later than April 30, 2017. The selection of papers is based on a peer review process that focuses on relevance, academic quality and originality. Globelics reserves the right to use available software to control for plagiarism and to take appropriate action in such cases.

Travel support: Faculty members and PhD students from developing countries with accepted papers to the conference can apply for travel support. Application for travel support must be submitted at the same time as submission of paper. Further information on procedure for application of travel support will be available on the conference website.

Contact Details: For further information on the conference organization please consult our website. If you have any questions that cannot be answered using the website, please send an e-mail to: athens.2017@globelics.org